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20130104
20130112
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
on traditional liberal arts education. . >> woodruff: ray suarez looks into china's current crackdown on the internet and on its own news media, which is drawing protests. >> ifill: and we remember pulitzer prize-winning journalist richard ben cramer, whose work spanned presidential politics and the lives of superstar athletes. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: saving for the heart. you'll be able to get close to iconic landmarks. to cultural places. it's a feeling that you can only get. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world viking river cruises, explore the world >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank y. >> woodruff: the renewed concern over mass shootings
education these days is the recent explosion of free online courses. universities are grappling with their impact on teaching and liberal arts education. newshour corresondent spencer michels has our story. >> mark this with d and in a valueive the term you mark with e. >> reporter: tracy lippincott, who works in a san francisco bar, is taking a college course in her apartment, online, on how to reason and argue. the teacher is walter sinnott- armstrong, professor of ethics at duke university in north carolina, and the class is free. >> so how do you learn the technique? the answer is very simple. you practice, and then you practice again, and then you practice and practice and practice and practice. this class has these really short little lectures, which is great because you can kind of watch one, and then think about it and react, and then you don't have to watch another whole hour like you would in class. >> reporter: "think again" is a class presented by a one-year- old for-profit startup called coursera, currently the nation's largest provider of free online courses. 170,0
months after the taliban tried to kill her for advocating education for girls. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year
, public investments and everything from sewers and infrastructure over all the education all of that will be cut and may be cut quite dramatically. the oer thing that worries me, jeffrey, is that there was no agreement on the debt kreiling which means that we're likely to see a continuation of this trench warfare we've had in washington at least since the summer of 2011 with almost no hesitation i think that the republicans in the 113th congress will use the threat of not going along with a rise in the debt ceiling as a way of extracting more concessions with regard to spending cuts. some of the spending cuts, as i said, particularly with regard to infrastructure and safety net programs, programs for the poor, are very critical for the future. >> brown: doug holtz-eakin, i guess there's consensus there's more to come, right? >> no question, we got a mixed bag. it got us past theliff and the biggest thing is addition by subtraction. we have a recession, that's the best news. for 98% of the taxpayers it gave them a permanent current tax law and took uncertainty out. but from an
at a number of the social and demographic factors as much. we do see differences in terms of education so there were some things with the study showing differences with education, with support at home could be a factor with that. it's important to keep in mind there are a number of factors that are not just related to psychiatric illness but stressors, culture, support, support at home, supports with school and those involved with the child or adolescent. >> doctor timothy lineberry of the mayo clinic psychiatric hospital and dr. daly of drexel university thank you both so much. >> thank you. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": requiring a search warrant for a blood test; reducing troop levels in afghanistan to zero; using robots as therapy; fighting the flu and denying major stars entry to the hall of fame. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: president obama is ready to name a new treasury secretary-- his own chief of staff, jack lew. it was widely reported today that the announcement will come tomorrow. lew played a key role in the recen
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)